A Reaction Regarding the New JGSOM Course

Presenting the new course to be launched by our very own John Gokungwei School of Management:

A TALK ON THE NEW JGSOM PROGRAM

B.S. MANAGEMENT, MAJOR IN

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ENTREPRENEURSHIP (ITE)

It’s been more than fifteen years since JGSOM launched its last program BS MAC, an innovative program that combines Chemistry and Management.  JGSOM is now poised to launch another innovative program: I.T. Entrepreneurship (ITE).  If you’d like to know more about this program, there will be a talk

BS MGT major in ITE TALK

March 14, 2011

4:30-6:00

SOM 103

What is ITE?

With the rapid advancement and sweeping changes in the fields of information and communications technology, the B.S. Management, major in Information Technology Entrepreneurship program is designed to create a structured and vibrant environment for young, aspiring entrepreneurs who are bold enough to set up their own information technology company. The program has a strong enough information technology base to enable students to appreciate what is possible with current technology and to come up and develop working prototypes of new product ideas.  It also has an overlay of business courses that will give students an appreciation of the challenges of business, and an eye to spot market opportunities, so that the products they come up with are not just technically feasible, but economically feasible and commercially viable as well.  Integrated into the program is a set of entrepreneurship courses that will guide the students as they turn their business plans into businesses with going concerns.

It’s a fact that majority of Business Process Outsourcing Activities are based on call centers. BPO, as defined by the National Statistics Office, is the leveraging of technology or specialist process vendors to provide and manage an organization’s critical and/or non-critical enterprise processes and applications.  According to one of the studies presented by the NSO, our economy has become dependent on either manufacturing, wholesale and retail trade, and real estate, renting and business activities. When we mean by business activities, that includes BPO.

A university such as the Ateneo have always created pathways in addressing such problems. For the School of Management, it should supposedly create social entrepreneurs or management leaders geared towards social responsibility at the very least. This course should supposedly create pioneers in the IT industry – a sector that has been dominating our country. It should initiate people to follow India’s way of climbing to the top. But by adding a course like this would raise certain issues. I will be using my present knowledge on Neoclassical Economics as a start-off point in raising the following arguments.

Technology improves the GDP of a country. It shapes the local businesses, exports, and practically everything in general thereby making it economically productive as we speak. It’s been dominating outside the airwaves and brainwashing the youth for generations that it practically controls our mindsets every so often. Aside from thinking about the word, technology, the government officials as well as the leaders in other sectors have to worry about employment. Just like any other developing country, we lack the technology as well as the employment to boost the development freedom or living situation of the people. Time immemorial this model has been a basis on emphasizing innovation on technology to pursue growth. In this country, it seems that we specifically have too much interest on Information Technology ever since the Internet Boom. Because of Facebook or Google likewise other social networking or information technology businesses, their company stories never fail to inspire great young minds in creating businesses similar to theirs.

First of all, you cannot enforce a person to be innovative by creating that kind of course. You cannot expect or necessarily foresee graduates of such courses to reconcile the beliefs of working under international BPO or IT companies and create new ones. I cannot say for sure that the paths Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg took were completely effective but I largely believe that it should be the initiative of the person and not the course which would mitigate the present employment, growth, and development problems faced by our country. If there is a need to take massive action such as creating this course, the problem does not lie in the lacking such course but on the misaligned objectives, missions, etc. met by the existing similar courses such as BS Management major in Communication Technology Management or BS Management Information Systems according to present needs and times.

Second, anyone can create businesses at their own rights. You don’t actually need to be a Management student to do that though the advantages of the JGSOM students are being able to learn the ins and outs of making or handling a business. That’s all. If one wants to push for greater scheme of things like expanding the business, leaders with different specialties could do so through active or dynamic cooperation or participation. Am I not right? In the world today, I don’t think a large company won’t survive if only one person handles all the company’s function. Instead of creating the said course, a Computer Science Major/Management Information Systems Major could tag along Management friends of the sort.

My third point, if this were to be a new course offered by the School of Management, this must be, as similar to the BS Management major in Applied Chemistry, a mash-up of IT-related subjects along with Management subjects. Based on this assumption, it is presumed that the knowledge on IT is half-baked. Sure, Steve Jobs and the rest were able to do that but one cannot say that their life story could be others’ success life stories. Information Technology is an art and even a science at one point. Not that I am saying that Management is not the way to go but I don’t think that creating this course is deemed necessary unless there is a marked failure on other courses’ part or even the university’s part on pushing the youth to create IT companies for the country’s and the people’s development. BS Management major in Communication Technology Management/BS Management Information Science is already enough don’t you think?

Social entrepreneurship – no one has to teach you that by the books. You’d have to immerse on it to believe. Anypne could actually make a business and one don’t need a specific degree to do that. Then again, it is very dim-witted for the JGSOM to create a course based on a trend and notion of being able to fix things by creating this new course. Information Technology is just one of the many solutions that could expand our economy and such and creating a course that explicitly says entrepreneurship does not solve our present problem of creating more workers under multinational companies.

If they really want to improve the country’s development status, why can’t they just review the present courses and do something about them? It’s not the lack of a course or an imbalanced structure of things we are facing here. It’s about the need to reshape our goals, missions, visions, character and such and push for an actual development through self-participation and cooperation.

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